What Is Geek Philosophy? Part 4: Recovery

Our series of posts on the principles of Geek Philosophy continues with a concept taken from J.R.R. Tolkien’s “On Fairy Stories.”


If you have been following this series, you know that Geek Philosophy discussions begin with stories. They don’t begin with just any stories, however, but with the imaginative tales of fantasy and science fiction. Grey Havens Group’s core values are literacy, imagination, community, and inclusion. Imagination is in there for a reason.

Memory sees, or purports to see, what we have already seen. Imagination sees things differently. The practice of philosophy demands that we cultivate different perspectives, that we look beyond our day-to-day concerns. Through philosophy and imagination,  we are able to extend our minds to conceive of reality as it might appear through the eyes of another or even across time and space. The problem is that we tend to get stuck in our own experiences, expectations, and desires, instead.

J.R.R. Tolkien wrote that human beings usually experience the world through “appropriation.” We approach the world with our minds already made up about it because we see the world as existing for us, rather than for itself. He believed that we free ourselves from the habit of appropriation through the practice of Recovery.

Recovery, or the ability to perceive without prejudice, can begin when we see ordinary things in an extraordinary setting. Tolkien wrote that we should not weary of painting because we see only the colors we know. Instead, we should make paintings that help us see those colors anew. This kind of thing happens when we see a strange wizard smoking an ordinary pipe or when we see an ordinary blue box surviving the vibrant tumult of the time vortex. What Tolkien called the “arresting strangeness” of the fantastic story wakes us up so that we pay renewed attention even to the story’s familiar elements, like pipes and blue boxes. Fiction that engages the imagination wakes us from the slumber of appropriation.

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A 2009 study by Proulx and Heine suggests that encountering what first seems to be a nonsense scenario, a blue box in the time vortex or a lamppost in a snowy wood, causes us to try to make a deeper sense by looking harder for meaning and coherence. If we are so entrenched in our appropriated world that we cannot imagine anything but only recall what we are used to seeing, we will not get very far in this process. Fantasy primes us perfectly for philosophy because, once our imagination is engaged, we can use it to conjure up all kinds of new possibilities. Geeks are great at this because we are drawn to otherness and entranced by the unknown. We are not afraid of the strange, so it doesn’t frighten us to see the strangeness in the everyday.

Have you ever wondered if there is a place where breathing oxygen and walking about on two legs would seem preposterous? If you haven’t, it is because you have gotten used to these things. Probably, it has never occurred to you to do anything but take them for granted. Being used to something or taking it for granted is not the same as understanding it. Until we look at our own two legs with as much amazement as we would look at the wings of dragons, our ability to understand will be circumscribed. Geek philosophy begins with the alien out there and ends with the alien in our own hearts. That is not as frightening as it might sound, not to us, because, in our story, an alien is the one who shows us how amazing the universe really is.

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We hope you join us in this process of recovery. Leave us a comment about a fantastical story that made you see your own world in a new way. Visit our Community menu and follow us on Facebook to find the Geek Philosophy discussions that are right for you.

Still want to learn more about Geek Philosophy? We hope so! There are more principles to share with you. Next time, we will discuss the principle of Geekiness – something that is, of course, near and dear to our hearts. You can’t have “Geek Philosophy” without the Geek! We also call this the “How you love it” principle, so stay tuned for more. We hope your days are enriched by philosophy, and we leave you with this final quote about recovery: Far from being disappointed in the ordinary world around you, you will see that both the ordinary world and the fantastical one are “born of the same magic.”

GHG’s Guide to Civil Discourse

LICI Collage Final

If you follow this blog, you know that Grey Havens Group is a non-profit committed to the values of literacy, imagination, community and inclusion. We host thoughtful book discussions, both online and in person, for children, young adults, and adults. We work to maintain civil discourse in every forum in which we speak as a group. Each of our values plays a role in that.

Literacy is more than the ability to read; it is about our relationship to information. One can be considered literate in a number of areas. People commonly speak about cultural literacy, political literacy, even computer literacy. To be literate is to value curiosity enough to want to look thoroughly at a topic and to be willing to allow yourself to grow based on what you learn. It is both the starting point and the goal of civil discourse. We believe that there is always more to learn!

Imagination is also vital to civil discourse. Imagination is what makes it possible for us to put ourselves in someone else’s shoes. It is where empathy comes from and, without empathy, we would not get very far in our attempts to understand each other.

Community and inclusion are complementary values. We strive to create communities around books and the imagination where everyone is able to feel safe and heard. A commitment to civil discourse is the first step in making this possible. It is a responsibility that we take very seriously. It means that we have high expectations for our members but the rewards are tremendous. Here is a basic guide to keeping conversation thoughtful and respectful.

Hate Speech: Let’s start by looking at something that we wish we did not have to examine–hate speech. Hate speech is defined as “speech that offends, threatens, or insults groups, based on race, color, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, disability, or other traits.” Just don’t do it, ever. Do not make generalized statements about any group of people. To do so denies the richness of the human experience and seriously undermines our group’s commitment to inclusion.

We do not want to remove anyone from a group but we believe that a reasonable person should be able to recognize hate speech. Using it is always grounds for removal from both online and live discussions.

Logical Fallacies: One way to keep a conversation from becoming heated and possibly hurtful is to be conscious of the ways we structure our arguments. Looking out for logical fallacies is a way to keep ourselves honest in discussion and to look more deeply at the source of our opinions. Logical fallacies include ad hominem attacks in which one attacks the person making the argument rather than the argument, itself. Other examples are stereotyping or making an argument that relies on a false generalization, and a straw man attack in which one sets up a simplified version of an argument only to knock it down. Straw man attacks typically involve characterizing a point of view in a way that robs the point of view of its complexity.

This is a good resource for learning about logical fallacies. When our young adult group, Grey Havens YA, read Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes stories, we put together this short, fun guide to clear thinking that we call “Think Like Sherlock.” We hope it will also be of use.

Statistics: Statistics are a powerful way to communicate information. They can be very persuasive because numbers do not lie. Numbers do not necessarily tell the whole truth, however, and, precisely because they can be persuasive, we should be careful about how we use them. Fact checking and citing sources (to the extent that this is possible in a spontaneous conversation) is a basic responsibility when it comes to using statistics but it is also important to recognize the limitations of numbers. The statement that 3 out of 4 dentists recommend Trident for their patients who chew gum tells us nothing about why those dentists recommend Trident or even how that statistic was calculated. Try not to reduce a complex argument to simple math.

Identifying Perspectives: People draw different conclusions based on the same information. This is because we each have different perspectives on that information. When speaking, try to identify your perspective as one of many possible perspectives. Speak only from your perspective but welcome the perspectives of others.

When we are interpreting information, we use our perspectives, including our experience and empathy, to determine a philosophical stance. This process takes place whether or not we are consciously aware of it. Try to be aware of your own philosophical stance and to state it clearly along with the information offered in support of that stance. Do you have a strong belief about what prompts dentists to recommend Trident? Express it as a proposition rather than as a fact and invite others to do the same.

Sometimes, we surprise even ourselves when we attempt to articulate a philosophy. It can be enlightening to examine what you really believe and why. This website offers tools, such as the political bias test that compares political knowledge with political bias, to help you examine your beliefs. Our willingness to examine our own beliefs encourages others to examine theirs.

Every week in live discussions and every day in our online communities, Grey Havens Group members demonstrate their ability to think critically and conduct civil discussions. The process is never perfect but, because we are committed to creating an inclusive community, it is vital that we never stop trying. Thank you for sticking with us on this adventure.

Making the Magic of Grey Havens Available to the Next Generation: Meet Robyn Bosica at the Real Myth Symposium

robyn at sing-along

About Robyn Bosica:

Robyn Bosica is the volunteer Co-Director of Grey Havens YA and currently resides in Frederick, Colorado. Robyn has been working with young adults in community events, theater programs, and service trips since 2008, and she is thrilled to be a part of a group as awesome as Grey Havens YA. For her work, she received the City of Longmont’s 2014 “Make Time for Kids Award” last November. Robyn holds a Bachelor’s degree in English and Writing from Towson University in Baltimore, Maryland. Her particular interests include creative nonfiction, science fiction, and the intermingling of literature and identity. An avid Tolkien-fan from the age of eleven, Robyn seeks to encourage the next generation of young adults to follow their nerdy passions and engage in the kind of world-building imagination that shines light into life’s darker moments. Robyn blogs about those moments, along with faith, grief, and beauty at her personal site, Chased by Light.

Robyn Bosica will be co-moderating a panel on Grey Havens YA and youth in nerd culture. Under her direction, Grey Havens YA will also present a series of Fandom Classes, a fandom-themed skit and a cosplay fashion show. The fashion show is open to all ages you can sign up here. Here is a brief description of the youth panel.

In October, 2013 the Grey Havens Group launched its young adult chapter, Grey Havens YA, a creative group for students in grades 6-12. These self-proclaimed young geeks and nerds meet once a week to discuss science fiction and fantasy, to work on creative projects, and to talk about what it is like growing up around muggles. Grey Havens YA has adopted as its slogan Wil Wheaton’s declaration that “being a nerd is not about what you love; it’s about how you love it.” At this panel, moderated by Co-Directors Robyn Bosica and Kelly Cowling, you’ll get to hear from the members themselves about what it means for young people to have a place where they never have to be afraid to show their enthusiasm for reading, critical thinking, and all things “nerdy.” 

If you’d like to know more about Grey Havens YA’s impact before you come, check out this story by one of our members and this essay from one of our parents. You can also visit the testimonials page on our website.

Register for Real Myth and Mithril: Delving into Fantasy Literature before April 1 to get the best deal on both days of the symposium. Space is limited.